Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms at the British Library

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An unrivalled depiction of life in the sixth century


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A piece of text from the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms exhibition
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R

ewind to 2009: a man named Terry Herbert discovered the largest stockpile of ancient gold and silver metalwork ever found in the muddy field of a farm up north. Coined the Staffordshire Hoard, it consisted of nearly four thousand items dating back to the sixth century.

These artefacts, along with an array of treasures from the BL’s own collection, are now on display, offering an unrivalled depiction of life in Anglo-Saxon times. Beowulf and Bede’s Ecclesiastical History will sit alongside the Domesday Book and Codex Amiatinus, a giant Northumbrian Bible taken to Italy in 716, returning to the country for the first time in 1300 years.

Come face-to-face with manuscripts of Old English poetry, encounter handwritten books intricately decorated with rich colours and discover finely crafted sculptures. 180 spectacular relics spanning six hundred years, all brought together for what most probably is a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition.

Elsewhere, Beyond Timbuktu is a free show transporting visitors to the Malian town of Djenné, a captivating World Heritage Site famous for its incredible architecture.

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Tickets £16, here, until 19th Feb. Beyond Timbuktu, free, until 6th Jan. British Library, open daily, 96 Euston Rd NW1

Main image: British Library


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